Episodes

Dec. 4, 2021

The Seminole War

As the United States continued to be dedicated to expanding its borders and territory, many indigenous and escaped enslaved individuals sought refuge in the Spanish held territory of Florida. Uncomfortable with the alliances made and desperate to attain the landmass to the south, the United States began a dedicated campaign to destroy indigenous settlements and led the Spanish to relinquish their control of the territory. Tune in as I dive into the Seminole War of 1818 and what impacts …

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Nov. 27, 2021

Watergate (with Hashtag History)

It is one of the most infamous political scandals in United States history; a massive conspiracy to spy on political rivals, influence voters and secure the presidential victory of one man, leading to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. Watergate is such a large and widespread political cover up, I couldn't possibly do it on my own. So this week, I asked the fabulous ladies Rachel and Leah from Hashtag History to help break down this infamous piece of political history. And follo…

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Nov. 20, 2021

Presidentress: Dolley Madison

Dolley Madison is one of the most treasured and popular first ladies in American history. However most of her story has been clouded with half truths and urban legend. This week, I dive into the life and times of Madison and try to get behind some of the myths surrounding the famous first lady.

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Nov. 13, 2021

James Madison: The Presidency

Tune in this week as I chat about the presidency of one of the most gifted political minds of the founding era, James Madison. Given all the work he put into the creation of the republic, it was never a question of if but when Madison would take the reins. So why is his presidency seen as kind of a dud? Tune in as I dive into this and more.

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Nov. 6, 2021

The Battle of Horseshoe Bend

This week I am diving into the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. Facing a continued onslaught of new white settlers and constant betrayal by the United States government, several members of the Creek Tribal Confederacy wanted to take a defiant stance against those invading their territory. However, others were more willing to engage with the white men and women, hoping to balance their culture with their own. The result was a civil war among the nations, exploited in the fight known as Horseshoe Be…

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Oct. 30, 2021

The Donner Party

It's almost Halloween, which means - it's time for a haunted edition of Civics & Coffee. This week I am diving into the trials, tribulations and downright horror that was the cross country journey of the Donner Party. There is cannibalism, sure. But there is also so much more.

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Oct. 23, 2021

The Great Quakes

Did you know the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was not the largest to hit the United States? Tune in as I discover a series of devastating earthquakes, known as the New Madrid Earthquake Sequence. For a few months in 1811 and 1812, residents of the small community were left helpless as the ground beneath their feet shook violently, destroying property and altering the geological landscape.

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Oct. 16, 2021

Black Cemeteries (Listener Request)

This week's episode comes as the result of a listener request! Someone asked me to review the history of black cemeteries in the United States. As Africans were imported to this country, their dead bodies were often discarded in undesirable locations of the property of those who claimed ownership of them. While their place of rest may have changed, the overall treatment of their remains remained questionable at best.  These historic burial plots have gone mostly unprotected and poorly m…

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Oct. 9, 2021

The Uprising: The Slave Revolt of 1811

Can you name the largest slave revolt in United States history? If you're thinking Nat Turner, try again. This week I am diving into the little known revolt of 1811, the largest slave revolt in American history. Estimated forces of up to 500 strong marched towards New Orleans, determined to free themselves and their brethren from the chains of slavery. Episode marked explicit due to the violence covered in the episode. Exercise caution with younger listeners.

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Oct. 2, 2021

Banning the Trade, Not the Practice

This week I am discussing Congress' decision to eliminate the international slave trade in 1808. While a key first step in the abolition of chattel slavery, the federal law did little to blunt the spread of slavery throughout the country. Protected by federal law, the domestic slave trade flourished, leading to the forced migration of millions of human beings.

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Sept. 25, 2021

The Presidency of Thomas Jefferson

Join me this week as I dive into the presidential administration of one of our most complicated and controversial figures, Thomas Jefferson. A man filled with contradictions, Jefferson could be both a brilliant visionary and a walking hypocrite. He supported limited government, until the Louisiana Purchase; opposed the Alien and Sedition Acts until he was attacked. Complex and challenging, Jefferson remains one of the most interesting and controversial figures in American history.

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Sept. 18, 2021

The Library of Congress

Join me as I chat about the nation's largest public library - the Library of Congress. From its establishment to its current collection, I share all about this fabulous institution.

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Sept. 11, 2021

Twenty Years Later: Memories of September 11th

It's been twenty years since the September 11th terrorist attacks. As one of the defining moments of a generation, this episode is walkthrough of the events of that day and memories by a few people who were kind enough to sit down with me and discuss their memories.

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Sept. 4, 2021

Sally Hemings

Tune in as I tackle the mystery surrounding Sally Hemings, the enslaved woman who had a decades long affair with Thomas Jefferson. While so much of her story remains unknown, the story of Sally Hemings remains a critical piece of the American story. Who was Sally Hemings? How did their relationship begin? And what evidence exists regarding their relationship? I attempt to tackle all of this and more with this episode.

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Aug. 28, 2021

Marbury v Madison

The Supreme Court is considered the ultimate arbiter of whether laws are in line with the United States Constitution. But how did they achieve this power? It isn't outlined in the original document. Judicial review, or the authority to determine whether a law is constitutional, came as the result of one of the most infamous court cases in United States history: Marbury v. Madison. So tune in as I discuss how we got judicial review and how John Marshall set the court on a historic journe…

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Aug. 21, 2021

Sacagawea & New Discovery

This week I dive into the Lewis and Clark expedition and the only woman to join the Corps of Discovery,  Sacagawea. Much of Sacagawea's life remains a mystery, but one thing that is certain is her impact and influence over the 5,000 mile journey undertaken by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and the Corps of Discovery. In this episode I cover the history of the Louisiana Purchase, the origins of Sacagawea and provide an overview of the journey to survey the new land.

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Aug. 14, 2021

Happy Podcast Anniversary

Civics & Coffee is officially one! Thanks everyone for the adventure. In this episode, I answer questions from YOU!

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Aug. 7, 2021

The Little Rock Nine - Part Two

Note: I was contacted regarding potential inaccuracies to my episodes about the Little Rock Nine. Thanks to their feedback, this episode now contains an edit. This week I dive into the lives of the Little Rock Nine after their first year at Central High School. Learn what happened to Ernest Green, Jefferson Thomas, Terrence Roberts, Elizabeth Eckford, Gloria Ray Karlmark, Minnijean Brown, Melba Pattillo Beals, Thelma Mothershed and Carlotta Walls LaNier after that tumultuous school year and…

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July 31, 2021

The Little Rock Nine - Part One

Join me this week as I start a series on the nine children who were the first to desegregate schools in the south. Elizabeth Eckford, Ernest Green, Terrence Roberts, Minniejean Brown, Jefferson Allison Thomas, Gloria Ray, Thelma Mothershed and Melba Pattillo were all just teenagers seeking the best education possible. History has dubbed them the Little Rock Nine; this week I provide the background to their story, including touching a little of the Supreme Court decision in Brown v Board of …

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July 24, 2021

Dirty Tricks: The Election of 1800

Infighting, attacking the opposition, secret compromises. While this may sound like a headline from today, it was actually all part of one of the most scandalous elections in history: the presidential election of 1800. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson went head to head in a contest that led to a mini constitutional crisis and influenced the development of the twelfth amendment to the constitution. Tune in this week as I dive into the election and its long term impacts to current politica…

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July 23, 2021

Two Songs One Couple / Civics & Coffee Crossover - Part TWO

Hey Peeps! Welcome to a special BONUS episode of the pod! I had the opportunity to chat with Peter and Sam from the epic podcast, Two Songs One Couple, and we decided to do a crossover event for the masses. Our crossover is a blend of both of our shows - a little bit of rock and roll, a little bit of history. Peter and Sam have part one - so go listen to it now so you have the context and know just exactly how this came to be. This episode is part two! Picking up where our conversat…

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July 17, 2021

Miss Independent: Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams is one of the most infamous first ladies in American history. She is known for her sharp tongue and her partnership with "dear friend" John Adams. Supporter of education for women, opposed to slavery and unafraid to share her thoughts, Abigail was definitely a feminist of the moment. But did you know she also was a business owner? Tune in this week as I cover some of the more interesting tidbits of our second first lady, Abigail Smith Adams.

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July 10, 2021

The Cabinet with Dr. Lindsay M Chervinksy

Join me this week as I interview presidential historian and award winning author, Dr. Lindsay M. Chervinsky. Dr. Chervinsky wrote The Cabinet: George Washington and The Creation of An American Institution where provides thoughtful analysis and tells the story of how and why Washington created the first presidential advisory council and why it was so revolutionary. In this episode, I chat with Dr. Chervinsky about her book, why she chose this topic to explore and what students can learn …

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July 3, 2021

The White House

Tune in this week as I dive into the history of the most iconic house in the United States: the presidential mansion, also known as The White House. The residence and workplace of the nation's chief executive, the White House has been known by many names and has some illustrious history. And though it is iconic, it mirrors our history in that its past is a bit complicated. So grab your coffee and hang out as I dive into the history of the White House.

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